Why isn't my ancestor here?

Under the immigration regulations of 1930, the following people were allowed to enter Canada without the permission of the Privy Council:

 - British subjects with enough money to sustain themselves until they found employment

 - American citizens with enough money to sustain themselves until they found employment

 - prospective farmers from any country with enough money to sustain themselves until they found employment

 - the wife, and children under the age of 18, of a naturalized Canadian man

After 1937, the fiancé of a naturalized Canadian man was permitted to enter Canada without the permission of the Privy Council.

After the Second World War, specific numbers of people within the following groups were permitted to enter Canada without the permission of the Privy Council:

 - people from Displaced Person camps

 - ex-members of the Polish Armed Forces

 - citizens of Malta

 - terrazzo workers from Italy

If your ancestor was in any of these categories, their name will not be on these lists.   

You may not be able to find your ancestor because the spelling of names in the lists may not be the spelling you are familiar with.

We will do a search in our database for free and only charge you if we find a list with your ancestor's information.  Please send an email to us at orderincouncillists@outlook.com with as much of the following information as you know:

 - First name and surname of immigrant

 - Year the immigrant arrived in Canada

 - Age when the immigrant arrived in Canada

 - Citizenship and country where the immigrant was living  when they applied to come to Canada

 - Intended occupation in Canada

 - Intended place of residence in Canada

 - Name of the person or company sponsoring them to come to Canada

 - City and/or province where the sponsor in Canada lived

Other places to look for information about your ancestor

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has a searchable database of naturalization certificates up to 1951.  Instructions on how to search for a certificate and order copies are shown at  http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/citizenship-naturalization-records/naturalized-records-1915-1951/Pages/introduction.aspx

If you have not already done so and you can meet the criteria, you can submit an Access to Information request to Citizenship and Immigration Canada asking for any and all documents they have about your ancestor .  Information on how to do this can be found on LACs website at 

http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/Pages/introduction.aspx  

The Access to Information form itself can be found at   http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/kits/forms/IMM5563E.pdf

There may be information about your family in city directories.  LAC holds an extensive collection of Canadian city directories and you can ask for a look up in these at https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/assistance-request-form/Pages/assistance-request-form.aspx?requesttype=3  Be sure to include identifying details such as names, dates, city or town name and addresses if you know them, but keep in mind that LAC has limited resources and cannot do comprehensive searches for you.

If you would like to contact a professional researcher at LAC, we can recommend Hagit Hadaya who has an excellent knowledge of their collections.  Hagit can be reached at hadayah@outlook.com

 

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Latest comments

28.02 | 15:53

Where do I find immigration from Ireland to Canada in 1950s? A friend's older brothers (aka Tuam babies), were illegally adopted out and sent there.

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12.02 | 21:51

Hi Janet,
Please look at the information on our questions page: http://www.orderincouncillists.com/205496190

I hope to hear back from you!

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12.02 | 03:22

Immigration from czechoslovakia 1945 to canada. Surname Kucera from Skoronice southern moravia in czechoslovakia.

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28.04 | 23:45

Joanna, I am so happy that your lists are providing needed information to other searchers on the web. I am pleased that my story has helped contribute to this.

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